Civil Liberties

The Future of Fair Housing and the Promise of Local Journalism

October 3, 2013
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For the past year, Baltimore’s local NPR affiliate station, WYPR, has produced a one-of-a-kind radio project called The Lines Between Us. Representing the best in local journalism, the series exposed listeners of the local news program Maryland Morning to the pressing issues of inequality and race that affect the city. While the community’s problems continue, the time-limited series has reached its end. The program staged a live recording of its final episode last Thursday at the University of Maryland School of Social Work, a fitting host for the show given the institution’s consonant goals of social justice. The program, upon which the reflections of this post are based, will air tomorrow, Friday, October 4th, and will be available online at linesbetweenus.org soon thereafter.

PATCON

  • By J.M. Berger
May 21, 2012

Since September 11, 2001, more than 300 U.S. residents have been prosecuted for crimes related to homegrown terrorism. About half were targeted by law enforcement using infiltration techniques – confidential informants, undercover operations, or, in some cases, both.[i]

Government and the Net Serve Us, Not Vice Versa

  • By
  • Rebecca MacKinnon,
  • New America Foundation
May 16, 2012 |

A global struggle for control of the internet is under way. At stake is nothing less than civil liberties, privacy and democracy itself. Electronic censorship and surveillance are on the rise -- not only in dictatorships but also in democracies. Facebook and Google are battling over who will be our gateway to the rest of the internet through "like" buttons and universal logins -- giving them huge power over our online identities and activities. Companies are clashing with governments over how far the law should extend into private networks, platforms and devices.

New America NYC Event: Transnational Crime-Fighting

April 26, 2012

Ever wondered how FBI agents catch globe-trotting serial killers? Or how journalists report stories about imprisoned international criminals? Here’s your chance to find out: You're invited to jump — risk free — into the world of transnational crime-fighting.
 

The Sidebar: Race Relations and the Evolution of Media

March 30, 2012
Tom Glaisyer and Reniqua Allen discuss the difficulty of talking about race in America and the evolution of media. Pamela Chan Hosts.

Rebecca MacKinnon to Congress: 'There Is No Silver Bullet for Achieving Internet Freedom'

December 9, 2011

Yesterday, New America Foundation's Rebecca MacKinnon testified before the U.S. House Committee on Foreign Affairs hearing on "Promoting Global Internet Freedom."

Political Repression 2.0

  • By
  • Evgeny Morozov,
  • New America Foundation
September 1, 2011 |

Agents of the East German Stasi could only have dreamed of the sophisticated electronic equipment that powered Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi’s extensive spying apparatus, which the Libyan transitional government uncovered earlier this week. The monitoring of text messages, e-mails and online chats — no communications seemed beyond the reach of the eccentric colonel.

How to Ignite, or Quash, a Revolution in 140 Characters or Less

Wednesday, July 13, 2011 - 2:00pm

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Do the Internet and social media empower Big Brother or individuals in autocratic regimes, or do they offer a rare level playing field?

Open Technology Initiative Welcomes Sarah Morris as Policy Analyst

March 15, 2011

The New America Foundation’s Open Technology Initiative today welcomed Sarah Morris as the program’s newest Policy Analyst. Morris previously served as a Google Policy Fellow with the Media Access Project, where she assisted with research and drafting of FCC comments on issues including media ownership, the open Internet and broadcast licensing. She earned a B.A. in Poltical Science and English from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and a J.D. and LL.M.

The Burned Generation

  • By
  • Afshin Molavi,
  • New America Foundation
January 21, 2011 |

Mohammed Bouazizi was the young man who set himself alight in protest against the lack of economic opportunities available in Tunisia. This young man’s act of desperation may have sparked a revolution in his own country, but what of the millions of unemployed youth in the Arab world? Already others have copied his act in protest. What must be done to prevent a whole generation from becoming burned?

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