Foreign Policy

New York's Next Extremist Shock

  • By
  • Steve Coll,
  • New America Foundation
November 1, 2012 |

New York can be as compelling in a hurricane as it is on a starry Saturday night. Some of the thrill of living in the city arises from its combination of majesty and vulnerability. Coming to terms with apocalyptic scenes is easier here than in other cities because the scenes have already been imagined, scripted and filmed by Hollywood’s dystopian directors. We step outside this week as if onto a familiar movie set.

Programs:

Is the Two-State Solution Still Relevant?

  • By
  • Leila Hilal,
  • New America Foundation
November 5, 2012 |

The apparent political dead-end in the Middle East Peace Process combined with a deepening apartheid-like reality on the ground, has reached a degree where many Palestinians and Israelis are asking not can the two-state solution be salvaged but should it? And, perhaps more urgently, what may be the alternatives? Khaled Elgindy, Fellow at the Brookings Saban Center for Middle East Policy and Leila Hilal, Director of New America’s Middle East Task Force, moderated a discussion on this critical question with Omar Dajani at the New America Foundation.

A Foreign-Policy Mystery: Six Areas the Debate Missed

  • By
  • Steve Coll,
  • New America Foundation
October 26, 2012 |

The final Presidential debate, devoted to foreign policy, was the most reasoned and the least polluted by rehearsed talking points of the three. The format and the moderator helped: the candidates sat side by side at a table, close to Bob Schieffer, of CBS News, who conducts interviews of this kind every Sunday morning on “Face the Nation”; his confidence showed, and the roundtable feeling seemed to calm everyone down.

Programs:

Enough About the Middle East Already

  • By
  • Andrés Martinez,
  • New America Foundation
October 26, 2012 |

The United States has lost its bearings in the world. Our foreign policy clings to a host of antiquated assumptions and no guiding strategic vision. It’s a bipartisan confusion, judging by this week’s foreign policy debate between President Obama and Governor Romney. The two men may have gotten personal in their sparring, but neither questioned the other’s assumptions about the places that matter most to Washington.

Programs:

The Sidebar: All Over the Map

October 26, 2012
Steve Coll, Jamie Zimmerman and Ali Gharib highlight the glaring omissions and surprising moments of the presidential foreign policy debate, and grade the candidates' global talking point. Elizabeth Weingarten hosts.

There's Nothing Foreign About Foreign Policy

  • By
  • Romesh Ratnesar,
  • New America Foundation
October 25, 2012 |

It took barely half an hour for Barack Obama and Mitt Romney to change the subject of their final debate from foreign to domestic policy. Responding to moderator Bob Schieffer’s question—“What is America’s role in the world?”—the candidates launched into their respective plans for rebuilding the U.S. economy. Obama talked about creating manufacturing jobs; Romney vowed to support entrepreneurs. Then they sparred over the merits of hiring more public school teachers.

Programs:

George W. Bush Won This Debate

  • By
  • Peter Beinart,
  • New America Foundation
October 23, 2012 |

Barack Obama didn’t win tonight’s foreign policy debate. Neither did Mitt Romney. George W. Bush did.

Bush won it because the framework for understanding the world that he put in place after Sept. 11 still holds, even though it wildly distorts the world that the next president will actually face.

Programs:

The Perils of Diplomatic Disengagement

  • By
  • Tara Maller,
  • New America Foundation
  • and Ambassador Timothy Carney
October 4, 2012 |

After the recent unrest at embassies in Egypt, Libya, Yemen, and Tunisia and the killing of U.S. ambassador to Libya, Christopher Stevens, there may be mounting pressure in upcoming weeks or months to permanently shut down embassies or rupture diplomatic relations. Already, there have been significant diplomatic staff withdrawals from many of the embassies.

Meet Mitt Romney, Mellow Internationalist

  • By
  • Romesh Ratnesar,
  • New America Foundation
October 23, 2012 |

Neither Barack Obama nor Mitt Romney had much to gain from Monday night’s foreign-policy debate. After four years, the country is familiar and largely comfortable with Obama’s handling of foreign affairs. The president’s principal goal was to remind voters, as early and often as possible, that he is the president who killed Osama bin Laden. Romney’s objective was even simpler: avoid any embarrassing gaffes that could halt his campaign’s momentum and raise doubts about his fitness to be commander-in-chief.

Programs:

Romney Endorses Obama's National Security Policies

  • By
  • Peter Bergen,
  • New America Foundation
October 23, 2012 |

Mitt Romney came to Monday night's debate with a choice.

He could run to the right of President Obama on national security issues and also differentiate himself on such tricky matters as what to do about Syria, or the United States' complicated alliance with Pakistan.

Or he could essentially endorse Obama's aggressive campaign against American enemies such as al Qaeda and the Iranian regime and his administration's approach to knotty problems such as Syria and Afghanistan.

Syndicate content