Pakistan

Optimism for Afghanistan's Women

  • By
  • Evelyn Crunden,
  • New America Foundation
May 8, 2014 |
Programs:

Boots on the Ground or Robots in the Sky

  • By
  • Evelyn Crunden,
  • New America Foundation
January 22, 2014 |
Programs:

The Limits of India's Historic Election

  • By
  • Evelyn Crunden,
  • New America Foundation
April 24, 2014 |
Programs:

What We Leave When We Leave

  • By
  • Evelyn Crunden,
  • New America Foundation
February 14, 2014 |
Programs:

Apprehension in Afghanistan: A Nation Goes to the Polls

  • By
  • Evelyn Crunden,
  • New America Foundation
April 4, 2014 |
Programs:

Talking to the Taliban

  • By John Bew, Ryan Evans, Martyn Frampton, Peter Neumann, Marisa Porges
June 27, 2013

The aim of this report is to examine the evolution of the idea of ‘talking to the Taliban’, analyse its underlying drivers and assumptions, and capture key lessons that may be of use in future conflicts when talks with insurgents will again be on
the agenda.

TESTIMONY: Drone Wars

April 24, 2013

The CIA drone program began quietly under President George W. Bush with one strike in Yemen in 2002, and then a smattering of strikes in Pakistan between 2004 and 2007 before a more sustained campaign in 2008. During his two terms in office, Bush authorized a total of 48 strikes in Pakistan.

TESTIMONY: After the Withdrawal

March 21, 2013

This past Saturday, March 16, 2013 marked an extraordinary moment in Pakistan’s history, as this is the first time that a civilian government has served its entire five-year term (from 2008 to 2013). And, for the first time in its history, the Pakistani military appears both unwilling and unable to mount a coup against any civilian government. The military has mounted four coups since Pakistan’s independence in 1947.

India-Pakistan Trade Relations

  • By Mohsin Khan, Senior Fellow, Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East, Atlantic Council
January 29, 2013

One of the more significant recent economic developments in South Asia was the revival of trade talks between India and Pakistan in 2011. A question frequently raised is why India and Pakistan trade so little with each other despite the existence of common history, language, culture, and long borders. Economic theory and evidence from around the world would predict that trade between the two largest economies in South Asia would be far greater than its current level of around $2.5 billion.

Syndicate content